Minutes from April 15, 2019 Meeting

Thursday, April 18 is Poem in Your Pocket Day! Share your favorite poem down in the comments if you’d like us to add it to the packet we’ll be sharing from throughout the day. Yesterday we shared some original poems and talked a bit about our relationship to poetry. We’d had a great time creating found poems last week but struggled when it came to putting together a satisfying poem using our own words. While all art is subjective, poetry doesn’t have as many concrete rules as fiction does. It’s harder to gauge a poem’s quality—even its doneness is a … Continue reading Minutes from April 15, 2019 Meeting

Minutes from April 1, 2019 Meeting

April is National Poetry Month! At our next meeting, Monday, April 8th at 5pm, if you have a favorite poem or find one you like over the course of your reading this week, please bring it along to share with the group. We’ll also do some found poetry exercises—words and materials will be provided, so no pressure! On Monday we wrapped up our diverse fiction discussion by pointing out that no one discussion is going to do the trick. The topic is vast and complicated—we’re talking about the full range of human experience, after all. We picked up a few threads from last week … Continue reading Minutes from April 1, 2019 Meeting

The Poetry is Coming

Hello Creative Writer, April is National Poetry Month so lets get the poetry flowing. If you’re like me then poetry might not be your strong suit. You might even feel as though this is a genre that is completely and utterly for other people, magical people who can make their poems feel touching rather than cheesy and eloquent instead of childish. When I was a very young writer I started out writing poetry and I was unafraid. I was fearless because I wasn’t judging myself against anyone else. I hadn’t read an epic poem; I’d never even dived into the … Continue reading The Poetry is Coming

Book Festival Season Part 2: Fall for the Book

Fall for the Book at George Mason University is one of my favorite literary festivals, and well worth the three-hour drive, especially if you live in Johnstown and are accustomed to driving to Pittsburgh to attend literary events. First off, the vibe. The campus is gorgeous in the fall: trees everywhere, leaves crunching. Tiny laminated festival posters, book covers of participating authors on the backs, hang fluttering from trees that line the walkways. There’s the requisite handful of big-name authors—the first time I attended this festival was purely to see Neil Gaiman—as well as nearly 200 other poets, journalists, historians, … Continue reading Book Festival Season Part 2: Fall for the Book