Writing to Deadlines

Hello Creative Writer, The topic I’d like to discuss briefly this week is working to a deadline. We are all writers here so we can be honest, like artists, we can be temperamental. Writing might slow or stale if inspiration doesn’t come or when other life concerns are more pressing. But what do you do when you have a deadline? Whether it’s a paper you must right for your Psychology class or a report at work that needs to be turned in by a certain time, some writing can’t wait for the muses to smile. I abhor deadlines but if … Continue reading Writing to Deadlines

The Writing Community

Been a quiet fall so far. I’ve been itching for chats with our writing group but there aren’t many of us at the moment. In lieu of meetings I’ve been sampling writing podcasts and reading every article on writing that crosses my path. It’s not the same, but I’m learning a lot. The internet is the best thing to ever happen to writers. When we formed this group last October, Twitter had for years been my substitute for a writing group. I’d followed a few writers so I’d know when they published new books or stories, and suddenly my feed … Continue reading The Writing Community

What’s the Point?

This is sort of our favorite topic these days. Recently someone asked me, “How’s the writing going? Have you published yet?” We won’t discuss my awkward handling of that conversation. Instead I’ll give you the answer I wish I’d given: “It’s going well, and no, but that’s not why I’m doing this.” People assume things. “Don’t forget us when you’re a bestselling author!” said a relative I’d never met before, when I said I wanted to write books someday. “It’s not very practical. You need a good backup plan,” warned a former high school teacher when she heard I was … Continue reading What’s the Point?

Minutes from April 1, 2019 Meeting

April is National Poetry Month! At our next meeting, Monday, April 8th at 5pm, if you have a favorite poem or find one you like over the course of your reading this week, please bring it along to share with the group. We’ll also do some found poetry exercises—words and materials will be provided, so no pressure! On Monday we wrapped up our diverse fiction discussion by pointing out that no one discussion is going to do the trick. The topic is vast and complicated—we’re talking about the full range of human experience, after all. We picked up a few threads from last week … Continue reading Minutes from April 1, 2019 Meeting

Minutes from March 4, 2019 Meeting

Yesterday we wrapped up our workshop from last week and did a little brainstorming with the writers. Afterward we talked about the four basic types of writing: expository, descriptive, narrative, and persuasive writing. The first three types are crucial elements of fiction writing, and exposition was a frequent topic in this workshop—some of our stories could have benefited from a little more of it, others from a little less or some fine-tuning of what was there. It’s not always easy to tell when you need more exposition to fuel your story and when your exposition is bogging everything down. There … Continue reading Minutes from March 4, 2019 Meeting

Resolve, Review, Persist

New Year’s resolutions tend to start gathering dust around February, and the artistic kind can be especially difficult to justify, especially when things get busy. But there’s no shame in starting over, and in fact there’s something to be said for not even starting until February. Whether you’re a month into a new habit and reassessing your goals for the year or just starting yours out, here’s a reminder of why you made those writing resolutions in the first place, and permission to take them seriously, in case you need it: In 2019: Persist, Persist, Persist.   Continue reading Resolve, Review, Persist

Dialogue

This week’s discussion was all about dialogue. If you missed the meeting and didn’t get the handout, you can find Thomasa’s tips for writing good dialogue over here, and here’s the rest of what the group came up with: How your characters speak is just as important as what is said. Be descriptive, but resist the urge to get too fancy with your dialogue tags—”said” is perfectly fine, and leaning too heavily on more interesting synonyms and adverbs can clutter up your writing; basically, make them count. Realistic speech isn’t grammatically correct, so dialogue doesn’t have to be and can … Continue reading Dialogue

Minutes from December 14, 2018 Meeting

For our final meeting of 2018, following up on our character discussions of the last couple weeks, each of our writers brought in a character, major or minor, to introduce to the group. Some came with lists, while others had chosen to stage interviews with their characters.  Pooled together, we had a range of internal and external details—family dynamics, educational background, personality quirks, physical appearance, religion, favorite foods, full family history, personal traumas, professional history, social skills, etc., and how some of those traits inform the others. It sounds like everybody came out of this exercise knowing more about our characters … Continue reading Minutes from December 14, 2018 Meeting